Do you sell into multiple countries and have country-specific domains?

If yes, you will need to setup a Hreflang attribute, so Google knows which part of the website to serve to which users, to avoid a duplicate penalty.

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Here is an example below πŸ‘‡

Targeting United States:

<link rel=”alternate” hreflang=”en-us” href=”https://www.example.com/”/>

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Targeting Australia:

<link rel=”alternate” hreflang=”en-au” href=”https://www.example.com.au”/>

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Targeting New Zealand:

<link rel=”alternate” hreflang=”en-nz” href=”https://www.example.co.nz/”/>

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x-default:

<link rel=”alternate” hreflang=”x-default” href=”https://www.example.com/”/>

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This tells Google that you are targeting the United States using www.example.com, Australia using www.example.com.au, and New Zealand using www.example.co.nz.

The x-default value tells Google to serve the main website when they’re unable to serve the language or region the visitor is searching in.

This will also show Google that each site is different and not a duplicate, which will give you the green light moving forwards.
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More information her on how to implement them: https://moz.com/learn/seo/hreflang-tag

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